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No More Excuses – 470 Outstanding Women in Analytics


In case your network doesn’t include many of the remarkable women you might consider, I have some lists to get you started. Here’s where to find more information and links to profiles of 470 of the industry’s best.



By Meta S. Brown

Dear analytics conference organizers,

What’s up with these analytics conference agendas packed with men?

Female influencers
Taken from Onalytica's Women in Tech: Hot Topics and Top Influencers

In case your network doesn’t include many of the remarkable women you might consider, I have some lists to get you started. Here’s where to find more information and links to profiles of 470 of the industry’s best:

Read These 285 Women Data Analytics Book Authors To Bolster Your Expertise

Discover 185 Outstanding Women In Data Analytics

Women are plentiful in the analytics community. Take a look at these facts and figures:

  • In 2016, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 52.5% of statisticians are women. This is not a new development. Look back 10 or 15 years, and you’ll see that women statisticians outnumbered men then, too.
  • Almost half of degrees in math and statistics are earned by women. Women have earned more than 40% of math and statistics bachelor’s degrees throughout the past 4 decades. In 2014, 43% of those degrees went to women, as did about the same proportion of master's and doctoral degrees.
  • Actuaries, the most heavily controlled and perhaps best compensated of the analytics professions, are 30% female. (Actuaries in the United States, 2007.) What’s more, the proportion of women actuaries is growing. Roughly 40% of actuarial bachelor’s degrees are now awarded to women, and in some recent years, women have earned more actuarial master’s degrees than men.
  • About one in three members of the American Statistical Association are women.
  • Women statisticians are influential in many countries - 41 of the world’s 190 statistical offices are headed by women.
  • 4 of the 13 key federal statistical agencies are headed by women today, and women hold important management roles in all of them.

As analytics professionals, you should understand that when a group is well-represented in a profession, but little see among the speakers at your events, that’s an indication of bias in the selection process.

You, yes you, have a biased speaker selection process.

I hear the excuses... women don’t apply, we have very special requirements, the women are in some other niche. You’re not fooling anybody.

The results and the excuses are not acceptable. It’s time to rethink your speaker recruiting processes.

Yours sincerely,
Meta S. Brown